Building Audits and keys

Let the auditing begin. I guess some major things have happened since my last blog post. With the middle of July coming, so did the time for auditing buildings. Armed with a clipboard, a set of master keys, and my pencil, I set off on my first building audit. I chose to try my hands at tackling Jonas Clark, one of our major academic buildings here at Clark. Since then I’ve made my way through the Sackler Science Center and our Biophysics building. Jefferson and the Geography Building are next in my sights. Who knows, maybe I’ll do them today.

So, what exactly does a building audit entail? Because I am not a professional auditor, my intuition can only get my so far. But that’s ok. A lot of the notes I am taking advise the installation of motion sensors for lights at certain points in the building. Anyone who has spent some time in Sackler is familiar with its long hallways. Over the school year these hallways are bustling with students as they move to and from their labs and classes. However, over the summer the picture is very different one.

As I make my way through each building I am sure to stop and talk to anyone I see working there. Although there are certainly things that I can pick up on myself, it would seem wrong not to involve the people who spend all day working in that exact building. For example, someone working in a lab in Sackler told me that no more than two people walked past him and down the hallway his lab is on in the past few hours. And guess what? The lights had been on the whole time. Many buildings on campus have these motion sensors, which flash green up in the corners of the ceilings, but Sackler does not appear to be one of them.

I try my best to take notes of good things that I see, too. Take our Education Department for example. I’ve spent my fair share of time down there in the ground floor of Jonas Clark over these past two years. However, it wasn’t until my last trip with my clipboard that I noticed how they chose to light the space, which houses faculty offices, a kitchen, library, and a conference room. The Department is laid out like this: a central, small library area is in the very center, then four hallways close in around the library, making a square. It is important to note that the walls of these hallways, which open up to offer access to faculty offices, do not reach all the way to the ceiling. Rather than turn on all the lights in the room, those in the department elect to only turn on the lights in the hallways, leaving the central area with books unlit. Doing so provides plenty amount of light while refraining from over lighting the area.

Example of a good lighting choices in Clark's Education Department.

Example of a good lighting choices in Clark’s Education Department.

So that’s a good thing. Another good thing is that Media Services tends to keep its doors open while blasting AC. Just kidding. That’s actually pretty unfortunate for obvious reasons. Another thing I learned during my audits is that there is a light installed under the walk way connecting Sackler and the Biophysics building that is always on. Always. Even during the day this little light of Clark University shines. I would be hard pressed to find a need for this light to be on even at night as there are much larger street-style lights no more than a few paces away.

Light on 24/7 outside of Sackler

Light on 24/7 outside of Sackler

I surprised myself a little bit this past week, too. On my way out of my office last Tuesday on my way to play with a watt meter and vending machines, Jenny pulled me aside. She was meeting with someone, and asked me to say whatever came to my mind when she said the word “empowerment.” After a brief pause as I tried to come up with something to say, I realized the answer was what I was about to go out and do. This internship has empowered me. When I began in the beginning of June I was not fully aware of how much sway I would have in the direction of the work I would be doing. Now, almost two months in, it has become pretty clear that I have a good amount of say in what I choose to do and how. Something great about feeling empowered now is that it is ok, and expected to a certain point, to make mistakes. That’s what learning is. Repetition through trial and error. This is something that I have also learned through managing The Local Root, a student-run venture aimed at providing the Clark Community with fresh, local produce. Both experiences have taught me that it is ok to learn on the go as long as you are willing to applying yourself fully to the cause at hand.

This all seemed like a pretty natural thing to say, and I forgot about it somewhat as I set off on my work for the rest of the day. I ran into Jenny the next day, and she told me something I didn’t expect to hear. She told me that what I had said influenced the woman she had been talking with to want to work in a college/higher education environment. After meeting with Jenny, she drove straight to Northampton, Ma, which happens to be where I grew up, to interview at Smith College. Kinda cool to know that something I said might have influenced someone else so much.

 

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